Windows

Prepare iSCSI Target Server to Host Failover Cluster Shared Storage

In this post I’m going to show my self or the others that read this post about how to configure a Windows Server 2012 R2 to act as iSCSI target. I was prepare 3 Virtual Machine running Windows Server 2012 R2, one as Domain Controller and the others two will be 2 nodes failover cluster. I will use Domain Controller (DC) as iSCSI target server to host failover cluster shared storage.

Before we add iSCSI Target Server role, we have to create new SCSI disk from Hyper-V Manager and attach it to DC01.

Open DC01 Hyper-V Settings, Select “SCSI Controller” – select “Hard Drive” – and click “Add

add-scsi-disk-01

Click “New” to create new virtual hard disk

add-scsi-disk-02

Click “Next

add-scsi-disk-03

Choose Disk format between VHD or VHDX and click “Next

add-scsi-disk-04

Choose “Disk Type” and Click “Next

add-scsi-disk-05

Specify Virtual Disk file name and location, click “Next

add-scsi-disk-06

Select “Create a new blank virtual hard disk, set it size and then click “Next

add-scsi-disk-07

Review the changes you’ve made and click “Finish

add-scsi-disk-08

You will return to DC01 Settings, and you will notice new virtual disk has just created, click “OK

add-scsi-disk-09

Open “Disk Management” on DC01 virtual machine and you will notice there is an additional disk. Add new simple volume and format that disk.

add-scsi-disk-10

add-scsi-disk-11

Once the SCSI disk was ready, now Open Server Manager and Click “Add roles and features

add-roles-feature-wizard

Click “Next

installation-type

Select “Role-based or feature-based installation“and click “Next

server-selection

On server selection page, select a server from the server pool and click “Next

server-roles

Expand “File and Storage Services” – “File and iSCSI Services“, then select “iSCSI Target Server” and click “Next

server-features

Nothing to add in “Features” page, click “Next

confirm-iscsi-install

Once the installation finished, go back to “Server Manager” and click “File and Storage Services

select-file-and-storage-services

Select “iSCSI” on file and storage services page and then click “To create an iSCSI virtual disk, start new iSCSI Virtual Disk Wizard” link.

select-iscsi

Select Volume E: and click “Next

select-e-volume

Type iSCSI Virtual Disk name, and take note for its location, and click “Next

specify-iscsi-vdisk-name

Specify iSCSI Virtual disk size, select disk type and click “Next”

set-iscsi-vdisk-size

Select “New iSCSI Target” and click “Next

select-new-iscsi-target

Specify iSCSI Target Name and click “Next

iscsi-target-name

On “Access Server” page, click “Add” to add servers that will be access this shared storage

add-access-server

Click “Browse” to select server name, and click “OK”

specify-method-to-identify

Repeat the same step on “Access Server” page to add the other server until you have two value on the list, then click “Next

servers-added

If you want to secure the initiation, you can enable “CHAP” and click “Next”

enable-authentication

Review all changes and click “Create

confirm-selection

Wait till all process completed and click “Close

view-results

Back to “iSCSI” page you can add more iSCSI Virtual disk by right click and select “New iSCSI Virtual Disk” and repeat the same steps above.

add-more-disk

Now, move to both cluster node to initiate connection to this iSCSI Virtual Disk. Open Server Manager – Click “Tools” from menu bar and select “iSCSI Initiator”

iscsi-initiator-menu

You will get prompt that Microsoft iSCSI Service was not running, click “Yes” to run the service

iscsi-service-confirmation

Type target name on “Target” text box and click “Quick Connect

quick-connect-sucess

You will now notice that all iSCSI Virtual Disk was detected on “Disk Management” console.

virtual-disk-detected

That’s it, you’ve successfully prepared the shared server storage for Windows Server Failover Cluster. Hope this help.

Advertisements

One thought on “Prepare iSCSI Target Server to Host Failover Cluster Shared Storage

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s